The cooking Journal

Posts in 'Nutrition in the Workplace'

Staying hydrated in the hot weather
It’s important to stay hydrated, especially during the current spell of hot weather.  We are made up of almost two thirds water and it is essential to life.  Having enough water in our system helps our body and brain function properly.  If you’re not drinking enough, you may find you are subject to headaches, stomach upset and your joints begin to creak!

The recommended amount of water we should drink is 1.5 to 2 litres a day – that’s about 8-10 glasses.  Sounds a lot?  Don’t despair - you take in water in other ways by drinking and eating.

If you don’t like drinking plain H2O then add a slice of lemon, lime or cucumber, a few berries or leaves of fresh mint to the mix.  Fruit juices are good, but beware of drinking too much because of the level of sugar and acid in fruit.  Tea and coffee should be drunk in moderation as they are mild diuretics so drink a herbal infusion instead.  Fizzy drinks also contain a lot of sugar and caffeine and should also be drunk in moderation.

Vegetables and fruit contribute to your liquid intake, as well as helping you reach the recommended 5 a day.  Just adding some salad to your sandwich and a piece of fruit to your packed lunch will help with hydration.

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#thecookingacademy #healthyeating #heathylifestyle #lunch #hydration #fitness #wellbeing #summer #healthtips # fruit
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The Well-being Revolution

The well-being revolution is truly underway and continued research and analysis backs up what we already know; building a happier, healthier, more connected workforce delivers excellent results for everyone.


Workshops


In our corporate wellness programmes we offer a range of workshops and seminars about the science of food, manage eating habits, and diet management designed to positively impact physical, mental and emotional wellbeing. Our fun and engaging sessions cover topics ranging from sleep, nutrition to energy levels and can be tailored to your requirements.

Coaching


We will coach your employees to improve their planning skills for better diet management to improve overall health. We recommend starting with your executive teams to identify their most pressing nutritional and well-being needs and assist them to set and reach their health and wellbeing goals. This philosophy can then be championed right across the organisation to create change across the board with demonstrable benefits

CSR


CSR is critical to core business values and sharing those goals to enable employees to participate will develop a strong sense of community within the organisation. With our extensive experience of CSR objectives and implementation we will help to fulfil and deliver your CSR commitments.

If you would like to more about our wellness corporate solutions please contact:

Francesca Yates on 01923 778880, alternatively email her on Francesca@thecookingacademy.co.uk    http://www.thecookingacademy.co.uk/corporate/the-corporate-athlete/
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How good is your sleep hygiene
ONE third of our lives are spent in bed. We all know a good night’s sleep is a great way to recover and rest after a full day. Getting a full night’s sleep is not a luxury, it is a health necessity and for those of us in the world or work or studying it is essential to productivity and wellbeing.  It is recommended that adults have between 7-9 hours of sleep per night, and more for teenagers and children. Yet it is estimated that a staggering 40% of adults are not getting enough sleep, Public Health England state that the annual cost to the UK employers is a resounding £30 billion pounds and 200,000 working days are lost to sickness and mental health every year.

Sleep is crucial in the maintenance of our cognitive skills.  Being adequately rested enables us to communicate well, remember key information, be creative and flexible with our thoughts, and improves our decision making ability. Furthermore, sleep is essential to building a healthy immune system, making you less likely to catch a cold and thus less likely to need time off work.

In addition although this may seem obvious, sleep is free, there are no side effects of having a great sleep, unlike taking caffeine tablets or drinking caffeinated drinks to try and stay awake.  Good sleep also makes you less likely to over-eat - so it’s good for your waistline.

There are many reasons we can struggle to fall asleep, work related stress, long hours at work, illness or injury and money worries are just a few issues that keep us awake at night. This is where sleep hygiene comes in effect, (nothing to do with your bed sheets!) but all to do with how you create the ideal settings for a good night’s sleep.

Here are a few points to think about:

  • Try sticking to regular bed times, set an alarm on your phone.

  • Making an effort to relax before your bed time approaches.

  • Avoid caffeinated drinks and heavy meals late at night; they’ll prevent you from falling asleep.

  • If you’re finding it hard to slow down, breathe in for a count of four seconds, hold your breath for four seconds and breathe out for four seconds. Repeat as many times as needed.

  • Also think about how your technology usage too - Checking emails late in the evening or before bed is often a cause of unhealthy anxiety and distraction.

  • Computer screens, tablets and phones all emit a blue light which keep us awake by suppressing melatonin, the hormone which sends us to sleep.


Public Health England and Business in the Community have partnered to put together a free downloadable sleep toolkit for employers.   Click here for more information:

(https://wellbeing.bitc.org.uk/all-resources/toolkits/sleep-and-recovery-toolkit?utm_source=Blog&utm_medium=Sleepblog2&utm_campaign=PHE)

Consider how effective your workplace well-being strategy is working.  If lack of sleep is a growing problem within your organization then it’s time to re-evaluate the strategy and its effectiveness.  You could be contributing more towards the £30 billion then you think. 

 

If you would like to know more about our corporate wellness strategies then please follow this link:   http://www.thecookingacademy.co.uk/corporate-events-team-building/cooking-nutritional-classes/
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Cheese, Spinach and Onion Scones
Cheese, Onion, Spinach Scones

Makes 5

 

Ingredients:

 

100g wholemeal flour

½ tsp baking powder

Pinch white pepper

100g mature grated cheddar cheese, plus extra for sprinkling

2 spring onions, chopped finely

125g fresh spinach, chopped

1 tbsp rapeseed oil

40 ml skimmed milk

½ tsp paprika

1 tsp English mustard powder

¼ tsp salt

 

Method:

  1. Preheat oven 180°C/gas 4

  2. Place a large baking sheet into the oven.

  3. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking powder and pepper together, add the spinach and spring onion then sprinkle grated cheese into the mixture to distribute it evenly.

  4. Make a well in the centre of the mixture and pour in the oil and half the milk, mix together and add the remaining milk until you have a soft but firm dough.

  5. Lightly flour a surface and gently roll the dough 2cm thick. Cut out scones with a medium cutter and then place on the hot oven tray. Pull together any scraps and roll out again to get an extra couple of scones.

  6. Glaze the tops with the extra milk and sprinkle a little cheese and paprika (if using) on the top of each scone.

  7. Bake for 12-15 minutes until golden brown.

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Water & Wellbeing
We all know how important it is to drink water, for some of us it takes a little pushing to get the right daily intake.  Whilst we are often tempted to brush off the effects of dehydration, it can lead to significant body changes both externally and visually as well as to our internal body functions.  Some of the more latent impacts will happen over a period of time and therefore less noticeable.   However long term, dehydration is very bad for your health and could become a trigger for, depression, diabetes, skin conditions and worse still other more toxic diseases.  Whilst it may seem somewhat dramatic, dehydration is a very dangerous and life threatening condition.  In time of sickness dehydration can literally lead to death so ensuring you are also hydrated is really important.

Symptoms of dehydration

Some of the more immediate and obvious signs of dehydration can be dry mouth, headaches, dizziness, constipation, tiredness, irritation.

If your body doesn’t have the fluid to remove waste then it will begin to develop and harbour toxins, this can lead to a number of health problems such as slowing down your metabolism which will lead to gaining weight.   Most commonly dehydration is often mistaken as hunger as so we will reach for something to eat instead of something to drink, which will eventually lead to weight gain, actually more quickly than you think.

Dehydration will also have a significant impact on digestion.  If your body is not digesting the nutrients you eat through food then your immune system will be weakened over a period of time, since the nutrients are not being absorbed by the body into the blood.  Furthermore water is essential to breaking down the sugar in our food.  If you continuously remain dehydrated your blood sugar levels will become unbalanced and could lead to diabetes.  Our nutritional class is a brilliant way to learn more about the correct types of foods we should be consuming, simultaneously with appropriate water consumption.

Medium term Symptoms

Dehydration will affect your concentration levels, and as that begins to build up this will begin to impact on your mood and irritability, leading to anxiety and then poor sleep patterns as the anxiety continues in your rest time.

You may also begin to see physical changes, dark circles around the eyes and possibly sunken eyes.  Your skin will become dry and shrivelled, as it is lacking water.  Water provides elasticity to skin and so your skin will age more quickly – leading to wrinkles or psoriasis.

Lack of water in muscles and cell system will lead to muscle cramp and joint ache.

The long term effects of not drinking enough water will be much more impactful, and potentially led to brain swelling, heat related injury (the body essentially burning up), a seizure, Kidney failure, Hypovolemic Shock, and potentially leading to a coma and death.

The role of water in exercising

If you’re a gym bunny, lifting weights or doing high intensity training, then during your training sessions are making much more demands on your nervous system, blood and energy levels than you might imagine.

When you exercise if you don’t have enough water in your system then your body temperature will rise and your sweat glands will swell, in a desperate cry for water. Blood is made up of 50% water, which is why the blood that is being used to transport oxygen and the nutrients to the muscles will be diverted, in order that your muscles get what they need.  If the muscles don’t get the water through the blood it will result in a poor workout.

Furthermore, when we sweat we lose a lot of important salts and electrolytes, for example sodium, potassium and calcium ions. These minerals are essential to allow healthy cell communication and will affect how your muscles contract, so replacing the salts/electrolytes is critical.

So in order to get the best perfomance your body need to be fully hydrate during exercise and hot weather.

The role of Isotonic Drinks

Isotonic drinks such a Lucozade, Powerade, Iso plus, contain electrolytes and carbohydrates. So when you are doing a heavy work out or engaging in strenuous activity, other secondary bodily functions such as digestion often temporarily ‘close down’.

Since Isotonic drinks contain small amounts of glucose they are an alternative to eating food,  such as a banana let’s say, and so they a quick and light way to give your body a quick boost of ‘food’ it needs to keep going.  So by taking a sip, (I emphasize sip) every so often you’ll avoid the heavy energy crash during or at the end of your workout.

Electrolytes also contain essential salts as well as carbohydrates so replenishing your salt levels after a heavy workout is essential.  A quick sip or two will help to maintain the cell function and prevent dehydration. Coconut water is also a very rich source of potassium which can prevent dehydration after exercise or hot weather.  Coconut water (not to be confused with coconut milk or oil) is significantly lower in calories than isotonic drinks as it is low in Carbohydrates and sodium so won’t help to give you an energy burst you may need.

Isotonic drinks can be expensive so making your own is advisable simply by making up a rich dilute of squash drink and adding a pinch of salt to it.

 

#drinkingwater #nutrition #corporatenutrition #healthylifestyle #healthylife #healthyliving
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