fbpx
Let’s keep the planet alive – protect soil diversity

If the impact of lockdown has taught us anything, it is the importance of looking after our planet and ecosystem.   What happens in the Amazon rain forest directly affects us in a very short period of time, and whilst the Amazon may seem thousands of miles away, the impact of global warming has already had very real effects on our own climate and weather patterns here in the UK.

It’s world soil day today and in celebration to raise awareness we’ve planted over 1000 bee and wildlife-friendly bulbs here in our garden which will hopefully pop up in spring next year.  It’s part of our commitment to helping increase soil biodiversity which is essential to maintain a healthy ecosystem and what our own human well-being depends upon.   Furthermore, we now recycle all of our natural food waste into composting bins together with all leaf mulch to return the food and autumn leaf drop back to the earth in the most natural way possible.  It is part of our commitment to increasing biodiversity and in the process improving the wellness of our clients for the crops and herbs we use in our everyday classes.

Plants nurture a whole world of creatures in the soil, that in return feed and protect the plants. A diverse community of living organisms keeping the soil healthy and fertile. This extensive underground world constitutes soil biodiversity and determines the main biogeochemical processes that make life on Earth possible.

What is World Soil Day

#worldsoilday is celebrated annually on the 5th December and is a worldwide campaign to “Keep soil alive, Protect soil biodiversity” and aims to raise awareness of the importance of maintaining healthy ecosystems around the world not just in our own area. The campaign also seeks to encourage governments, organisations, communities, and individuals around the world to proactively improve soil health in their local regions.

Did you know?

  • Soil is a living resource, home to more than 25% of our planet’s biodiversity
  • It is estimated that only 1% of soil microorganism species are currently known compared to 80% of plant species
  • Up to 90% of living organisms live or spend part of their lifecycle in soils
  • Soil organisms can break down certain contaminants.